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What is the Crown of Scotland and why is it placed on the Queen’s coffin?

THE Crown of Scotland will be placed on the Queen’s coffin while it lies in rest in St Giles’ Cathedral in Edinburgh.

Historically, the crown has been used in ceremonies to represent the sovereign’s presence and it will be placed on Queen Elizabeth’s coffin by the hereditary Keeper of the Palace Holyroodhouse Alexander Douglas-Hamilton, the 16th Duke of Hamilton.

Historic Environment Scotland confirmed it will remain with the Queen while she lies in rest at St Giles’ Cathedral in Edinburgh – where thousands of Scots are expected to go to pay their final respects.

After that, the Crown of Scotland will be returned to Edinburgh Castle – where it is usually on display – and will be present for visitors to see when the castle reopens on Wednesday.

The Crown of Scotland is on loan to Historic Environment Scotland, who care for it on behalf of the Commissioners for the Keeping of the Regalia.

READ MORE: Stone of Destiny to be moved to London for King Charles’s coronation

Made from gold, silver and precious gems, the crown is the centrepiece of the Honours of Scotland – which are the oldest Crown jewels in Britain and among the oldest in Europe.

The solid-gold crown in its current form dates back to 1540, when King James V of Scotland ordered the royal goldsmith to melt down the old crown and refashion it.

More than 40 ounces of gold mined from the Upper Clydeside were added to the circlet of the crown, which weighs 1.59kg.

James V first wore the refashioned crown at the coronation of Mary of Guise in 1540, with Mary Queen of Scots becoming the first monarch to be crowned using the new crown and sceptre together in 1543.

Following the Act of Union in 1707 the Honours of Scotland were locked in a chest and sealed away.

READ MORE: Six times BBC left Scots scratching our heads over its coverage of Queen’s death

In 1818, Sir Walter Scott discovered the Honours locked away in Edinburgh Castle.

They were put on display at Edinburgh Castle the following year and have been there ever since.

They are usually displayed in the Crown Room alongside the Stone of Destiny, which is set to be temporarily moved to London for the coronation of the new King.



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